Eagle-Eyed JPSS-1 Weather Satellite to Launch Nov. 14 After Delay

After greater than a yr of preparations for liftoff, NASA will launch the primary of 4 brand-new climate satellites subsequent week after a four-day delay as a consequence of a battery glitch.


The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) will launch no sooner than Nov. 14 from California’s Vandenberg Air Force Base aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. The mission, a part of the area company’s collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), was initially scheduled to launch Friday, Nov. 10. But NOAA officers introduced yesterday (Nov. 6) defective battery on the Delta II booster prompted the delay. 


“The delay allows the team time to replace the battery on the Delta II booster,” NOAA officers wrote in an announcement. “The vehicle and spacecraft remain stable.” [Earth from Space: The Amazing Photos by GOES-16]


The Joint Polar Satellite System is a partnership between NASA and NOAA, in response to a latest NASA badertion: NASA develops, builds and launches the devices, and NOAA funds and manages this system operations. 

This illustration depicts the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPSS-1, spacecraft set to launch on Nov. 10, 2017. It is designed to provide forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally, with crucial environmental science data to give a better understanding of changes in Earth's weather, oceans and climate.

This illustration depicts the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPSS-1, spacecraft set to launch on Nov. 10, 2017. It is designed to supply forecasters, each within the U.S. and internationally, with essential environmental science knowledge to offer a greater understanding of adjustments in Earth’s climate, oceans and local weather.

Credit: Ball Aerospace


JPSS-1 shall be renamed NOAA-20 when the spacecraft reaches its orbit at 512 miles above Earth’s floor. At that time, it can make common and diversified environmental observations from area, permitting NOAA to extra precisely warn the general public about excessive climate programs. NOAA-20 will even help in monitoring much less episodic — however however alarming — environmental developments, comparable to poor air high quality. All this info shall be accessible by each home and worldwide customers through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) community.


The NOAA-20 satellite tv for pc will traverse the globe about twice each day, and can go over the equator about 14 instances in that point span, in response to NASA. As the spacecraft travels from one pole to the opposite throughout its 10-year mission, it can observe floor and atmospheric temperatures, clouds, rainfall, snow and ice cowl, water vapor, vegetation and the ozone layer.

On April 11, 2017, the United Launch Alliance Delta II second stage that will lift JPSS-1 into orbit Nov. 10 was hoisted into the gantry at Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

On April 11, 2017, the United Launch Alliance Delta II second stage that may elevate JPSS-1 into orbit Nov. 10 was hoisted into the gantry at Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin


Built by Ball Aerospace of Boulder, Colorado, the primary stage of the ULA Delta II rocket reached the bottom again on April Four, 2016, and the intermediate and second levels arrived later that month. About a yr later, on April 11, 2017, technicians hoisted the second stage atop the primary stage of the rocket. The climate satellite tv for pc arrived to Vandenberg on Sept. 1, and following preflight preparations, it was encapsulated and mounted atop the Delta II rocket.


Future satellites deliberate for the JPSS mission embody JPSS-2, scheduled for launch in 2021. JPSS-Three is scheduled to enter orbit in 2026, and JPSS-Four in 2031.


Editor’s be aware: This story was up to date to incorporate the four-day launch delay as a consequence of a Delta II rocket battery challenge.


Follow Doris Elin Salazar on Twitter@salazar_elin. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.




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