Coronavirus Sweden: lowest cases since March with 108


Sweden has recorded the lowest number of Kovid cases since March, with 108 not implementing lockdown in the country.

  • Sweden’s seven-day average for coronovirus was 108 as of Tuesday
  • This figure is the lowest since March 13 when it decided not to impose lockdown
  • France, Spain, Britain and the Czech Republic all have high numbers of cases

Sweden has recorded its lowest daily cases of Kovid-19 since the peak of the epidemic in March.

The Scandinavian country, which was initially criticized for not enforcing lockdown, is now seeing significantly fewer cases than other European hotspots.

Its rolling seven-day average stood at 108 on Tuesday, its lowest number since March 13.

Sweden has recorded its lowest daily cases of Kovid-19 since the peak of the epidemic in March.

Stockholm, painted in May when the rest of Europe was in the grip of a lockdown, opted for a milder approach

Stockholm, painted in May when the rest of Europe was in the grip of a lockdown, opted for a milder approach

Its seven-day average for coronavirus-related deaths is zero.

According to The Guardian, only 1.2 percent of Sweden’s 120,000 trials returned last week, their National Health Agency date suggests.

Their 14-day total accumulation in new cases is 22.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, compared to 279 in Spain, 158.5 in France, 118 in the Czech Republic, 77 in Belgium and 59 in the UK.

All those countries implemented a lockdown in the event of an epidemic in March but Sweden opted for a lighter approach, which now starts paying off.

It is also outperforming its Scandinavian neighbors, Norway and Denmark, their approach may suggest they have been helped in the long term.

The Scandinavian country, which was initially criticized for not enforcing lockdown, is now seeing significantly fewer cases than other European hotspots

The Scandinavian country, which was initially criticized for not enforcing lockdown, is now seeing significantly fewer cases than other European hotspots

Sweden held open schools for children under 16, banned gatherings of more than 50 people and asked more than 70 and vulnerable groups to self-segregate.

Shops, bars and restaurants remained open throughout the epidemic and the government was not advised to wear masks.

In Sweden, the death rate has been steadily falling, despite summer cases peaking in April – the country’s top epidemiologist said deaths could be kept low without drastic lockdown measures.

France recorded its highest spike in cases on Saturday with more than 10,000, but the deaths are nowhere to be seen in mid-April and the country’s PM says ‘being able to live with the virus’ without going back into lockdown needed’.

Current infection rates in Europe According to the European Control Center (ECDC), with Spain and France in recent rebound in the worst-affected countries

Current infection rates in Europe, according to the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC), with Spain and France among the worst affected countries in recent rebounds

In the United States, cases for recording levels rose in July and August after the first wave – but mortality rates in summer hotspots like Texas and Florida were far below those in New York City, where the virus hit hardest in the spring had gone.

Cases in Sweden reached their height in the second half of June, when more than 1,000 infections were seen in a few days – but the death toll continued to decline.

Sweden’s state epidemiologist Anders Tegenel, who has become the face of no lockdown strategy, said in a recent interview that measures for voluntary sanitation were ‘effective’ as a complete shutdown.

“The rapidly decreasing cases in Sweden right now are another indication that you can significantly reduce the number of cases in a country without a complete lockdown,” he said.

Teignel said that ‘deaths are not so closely associated with the amount of cases you have in a country’, saying that mortality was more closely linked to whether older people are getting infected and how well the health system Can withstand.

“Those things will affect mortality a lot more, I think, than the actual prevalence of the disease,” he said.

Meanwhile, Swedish economic activity has begun and the effects of the recession appear less severe than previously anticipated.

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