Coronavirus is now in every American county – including a remote aerial enclave for leprosy patients.


According to a new report, coronavirus has now infected all 3,006 counties across the United States.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the last county to file a positive case was the smallest in the country: Kalawao County, a remote island enclave in Hawaii, was established in the 1860s.

The first case of Kalawao was reported on December 10 when a resident received a positive COVID result after returning from a trip to Honolulu to the county.

Five leprosy patients, all of whom are elderly and considered to be at high risk, still live in Kalawao.

However, the county has so far managed to avoid further outbreaks, with the man who tested positive to alert authorities and calm himself.

The discovery occurred in Kalawao on January 20, 2020, just 11 months after the first case of COVID-19 was reported in Snohomish County, Washington.

Since then, the virus has continued to break its way across the country, infecting more than 24 million Americans and killing more than 400,000 people.

As reported by the WSJ, data released by Johns Hopkins indicated that COVID-19 has now reached 48 contiguous states and each of Hawaii’s counties.

While Alaska does not have formal counties, its own data dashboard for the virus shows cases in all of the state’s boroughs and census tracts.

The last county to file a case is the country’s smallest: Kalawao County (above), a remote island enclave in Hawaii that was established in the 1860s for people suffering from leprosy.

In 1866, during the reign of Kamehameha V, the Hawaii legislature passed a law, which resulted in the designation of Molokai as the site for the Kopper Colony, where it was forced to separate patients severely affected by the disease. it was done.

In 1866, during the reign of Kamehameha V, the Hawaii legislature passed a law, which resulted in the designation of Molokai as the site for the Kopper Colony, where it was forced to separate patients severely affected by the disease. it was done.

What did Calava County Laprosky have to say?

In 1866, during the reign of Kamehameha V, the Hawaii legislature passed a law that resulted in Molokai being designated as the site for the leper colony, where it was severely affected by leprosy (also as Henson’s disease Known) patients can be quarantined. To prevent infecting others.

At the time, the disease was poorly understood: it was considered highly contagious and incurable until the advent of antibiotics. The communities in which leprosy people lived were under the administration of the Board of Health appointing superintendents on the island.

At its peak, the enclave had about 1,200 men, women and children deported.

The segregation law enacted by Kammeha V remained in force until 1969, when it was repealed.

Father Damian – or Saint Damian of Molakai – a Catholic clergyman, settled there in 1873.

He cared for the residents of the enclave for 11 years, helping prevent their illnesses, building coffins, digging graves and eating with them, before catching the disease.

He continued his work despite the infection but eventually succumbed to the disease on 15 April 1889.

Father Damien was ordained by Pope Benedict XVI on 11 October 2009. He is considered a spiritual protector for leprosy and excommunication.

The day of his death, April 15, is also a minor statewide holiday in Hawaii.

After the end of the segregation law in 1969, the state legislature considered a complete shutdown of the facility. However, after the flare-up in public, he allowed residents who wanted to live there to do so for life.

Opponents of the closure pointed out that, although there were no active cases of leprosy in the colony, many residents were physically suffering from the disease to a large extent, which, if not impossible, led to their integration into mainstream society. Will make it difficult.

Five residents live in the facility and share an average age of 86.

At the onset of the epidemic, the virus first plagued major, densely populated cities – such as New York City and Los Angeles – for months before eventually spreading to more thinly populated rural counties.

By November, the coronovirus had reached Loving County, the second-smallest county in the country in Texas, which boasts a population of just 169.

The following month, the nation’s smallest county, Kalawao, became the last to file a case of the disease.

The hard-to-reach small Molokai Island enclave was founded in 1866 and housed thousands of patients with leprosy patients – now known as Henson’s Disease – who were forced into exile.

Father Patrick Killilia, pastor of St. Francis Church in Kalupa, a small town in the county, told the Journal that the enclave’s remit had helped keep the virus at bay for some 11 months.

He said, “This is a place of isolation.” ‘We know that the rocks and the ocean have protected us.’

According to Killilia, the county has a limited relationship with the outside world.

Residents, of whom only around 70, if they wish to reach other parts of Molokai, can take a plane or cross a footpath over the climbing cliffs of the county.

According to the WSJ, the settlement relies on a one-time annual trip for critical supplies.

But despite the county’s secession, Hawaii’s Department of Health took steps to close the settlement because COVID-19 began to grow in mainland American nursing homes early last year.

State health officials reportedly made limited visits to the county to protect their last five remaining Hansen’s disease patients, in addition to various other security measures.

Five patients, who are free to come and go from the county, share an average age of 86. Some of them have serious underlying health conditions and are considered high risk from COVID-19.

However, despite measures taken by health officials, the county reported its first case of the virus on 10 December.

The infected person, a resident, picked up the virus while living outside the enclave, but found out about their positive case after returning home.

According to the journal, the patient was asymptomatic. He reportedly took a COVID test back in Honolulu, but only when positive results were obtained in Kalupa County.

Remarkably, the county managed to avoid the outbreak after three close contacts on the infected person and their flight quarantined after landing.

At its peak, the enclave had about 1,200 men, women and children in exile.

At its peak, the enclave had about 1,200 men, women and children in exile.

Father Damian - or Saint Damian of Molokai, a Catholic clergyman, settled there in 1873.  He cared for the enclaves for 11 years, helping them heal their illnesses, building coffins, digging graves, and dining with them, before catching the disease.

Father Damien (1840–1889) stands with patients outside his church on Molokai Island.  He served in the island's leper colony, eventually contracting the disease himself

Father Damian (left) – or Saint Damian of Molokai – a Catholic priest, settled there in 1873. He cared for the residents of the enclave for 11 years, helping to cure their illnesses, building coffins, digging graves and eating with them, before catching the disease. Self

After the abolition of the segregation law in 1969, the state legislature considered a complete shutdown of the facility.  However, after the flare-up in public, he allowed residents who wanted to live there to do so for life.  Five people left

Following the end of the segregation law in 1969, the state legislature considered a complete shutdown of the facility. However, after the flare-up in public, he allowed residents who wanted to live there to do so for life. Five people left

An Air Health Department official called the person a ‘hero’ for quickly reporting his case and following quarantine.

In the state as a whole, Hawaii has reported 24,551 cases of COVID-19 since the epidemic began, and 322 people died. It currently has the second lowest test positivity rate of 2.4 percent in the country. The lowest is Vermont, with 2.3.

Each borough and census tract of Alaska’s coronovirus dashboard are also showing cases. The state currently has a 3.1 percent test rate – the fourth lowest in the country.

One of the last boroughs to be affected by the virus in Alaska was Skegway, home to about 1,000 people, but more than a million tourists visit each year.

With the hospital closest to the hospital for nearly an hour, officials swiftly stepped in to protect the area against the virus. When the epidemic began, the realization of a local outbreak could be catastrophic.

However, after Mike O’Daniel traveled back with his wife after an unrelated hospital visit, the virus finally arrived in mid-October.

One of the last boroughs affected by the virus in Alaska was in the southeast of Skagway State, home to about 1,000 people

One of the last boroughs affected by the virus in Alaska was in the southeast of Skagway State, home to about 1,000 people

O Daniel told the Journal that soon after his return, several members of his family fell ill – including his 93-year-old mother.

Thankfully, all of his family survived, though his brother was temporarily tied up in an intensive care unit in Seattle.

Since O’Daniel’s case, Skegway has had 16 other cases of the virus.

The 73-year-old hardware store worker said he quickly alerted local officials to his situation.

‘It is a small town; Everyone is getting to know about it in some way, ‘he said. ‘I’ll just protect my friends.’

Preliminary figures released on Thursday indicate that 2020 will be the deadliest year in American history.

Last year a record 3,260,397 people died, which public health experts say is indirectly caused by epidemic deaths and exacerbations caused by COVID-19.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the figure is about 15 percent higher in 2019 than 2,935,533 Americans.

Other fatal years in American history include 1,430,079 deaths in 1918, the year of the Spanish flu pandemic, and the end of World War I; There were 1,459,544 deaths in 1943, the deadliest year of World War II, and 1,930,082 deaths in 1968 at the height of the Vietnam War.

According to Johns Hopkins University data, COVID-19 caused 347,341 deaths in the US in 2020.

Since then, the virus has killed more than 58,000 people, with the death toll exceeding 406,000 – more than the number of Americans killed in World War I, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined.

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