Children who write by hand learn and remember more than those who use computers, experts say


Children writing by hand learn and remember more than those who use computers, with paper sparking activity responsible for the brain and part of the brain, experts say

  • One study found that children learn and remember things while writing
  • This is compared to the use of computers or other devices
  • Researchers found that when children use handwriting, the part of the brain responsible for processing, attention and language that increases with activity
  • The team also notes that handwriting may be of equal benefit to adults

About 45 US states do not require schools to teach handwriting to students, but a new study shows that skills are important for a child’s development.

After an examination of brain activity, researchers using a pen and paper found that helping children learn and remember more than recording information on a computer.

The data showed increased activity in the sensorimotor parts of the brain, which are involved with processing, attention, and language.

The scientist also found that the act was beneficial for adults, suggesting that they would remember the material better after writing them.

After an examination of brain activity, researchers found using a pen and paper to help children learn and remember more than recording information on a computer

The research was conducted by a team at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), which now suggests national guidelines to ensure that children are receiving some handwriting.

Professor Audrey van der Meer and his team have examined the benefits of handwriting over the years.

In 2017, it examined the brain activity of 20 students and a recent study examined brain activity in twelve young adults and twelve children – the first time the team analyzed the children.

The EEG was used to track and record brain wave activity using a hood fitted with more than 250 electrodes attached to the outer lining.

The EEG was used to track and record brain wave activity using a hood fitted with more than 250 electrodes attached to the outer lining.  The data showed increased activity in the sensorimotor parts of the brain, involved with processing, attention, and language

The EEG was used to track and record brain wave activity using a hood fitted with more than 250 electrodes attached to the outer lining. The data showed increased activity in the sensorimotor parts of the brain, involved with processing, attention, and language

The electrode is designed to take electrical pulses produced by the brain.

Each test took 45 minutes per person, and the researchers scored 500 data points per second.

Results showed that in both young adults and children the brain is much more active when writing by hand than when writing on the keyboard.

‘Van der Meer said,’ The use of pen and paper gives the brain more ‘hook’ to hang your memories.

“Writing by hand creates more activity in the sensory parts of the brain.”

“A lot of senses are activated by pressing a pen on paper, listening to the letter you write and the sound you hear while writing.”

‘These realization experiences create connections between different parts of the brain and open the brain to learning. We both learn better and remember better. ‘

Computers and smartphones have been around for all generations, but the youth group has spent its entire life with digital devices.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, children aged 12 to eight spend four to six hours with equipment in the US, while teens spend up to nine hours.

Most schools in the country are organizing online learning, children can spend more time on average as well.

Since 2010, 45 states have adopted the Common Core Standards, which leave teaching handwriting in individual states and districts.

As a result, many teachers broke away from pen and paper and moved towards the buttons on the keyboard.

Several states have made efforts to revive writing in schools, with California, Georgia and Massachusetts mandating legislation, and legislators in Idaho instructed the state’s board of education to include cursive in the curriculum Has passed a bill.

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