Health – Tech2 https://tech2.org Trending News Wed, 19 Dec 2018 06:48:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.1 The young girl's inoperable brain tumor mysteriously disappears without a trace – BGR https://tech2.org/the-young-girls-inoperable-brain-tumor-mysteriously-disappears-without-a-trace-bgr-2/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 06:46:58 +0000 https://tech2.org/the-young-girls-inoperable-brain-tumor-mysteriously-disappears-without-a-trace-bgr-2/

When Roxli Doss, 11, and his family received the news that he had developed a brain tumor that was inoperable, one can imagine his dismay. They were told that the tumor, which was diagnosed by doctors at multiple institutions, including Johns Hopkins, as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), had no cure.

That was in June 2018, and now, half a year later, the tumor can not be found. Young Roxli's MRIs have no trace of the tumor, and doctors can do little more than scratch their heads.

"It's very weird, but when we see it, it's a devastating disease," explained Dr. Virginia Harrod of Dell's Children's Medical Center. "He has a reduced ability to swallow, sometimes loss of vision, reduced ability to speak, and finally difficulty breathing."

Although there is no cure for the disease, Roxli's family decided to continue with an 11-week radiation course. They were helped financially by friends and family, as well as by others who contributed to a benefit that the family maintained a few months after their diagnosis. The family has also established a GoFundMe to offset some of the high costs.

Radiation therapy is given because it has been shown to slow the growth of cancers by killing cancer cells over time. Several sessions are needed to progress against cancer, but radiation alone is not considered a cure for the disease. It is not clear if this is a rare exception to that rule or if there is something else at stake that eluded medical professionals.

While the cancer seems to have completely disappeared, Roxli's family and doctors are taking a cautious approach. The girl will still undergo additional treatments to improve the odds against the possible return of cancer, but for now things look very positive.


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The last congressman of the Republican Party in New England interposed an appeal to keep the seat https://tech2.org/the-last-congressman-of-the-republican-party-in-new-england-interposed-an-appeal-to-keep-the-seat/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 06:41:06 +0000 https://tech2.org/the-last-congressman-of-the-republican-party-in-new-england-interposed-an-appeal-to-keep-the-seat/

The last remaining Republican congressman in New England filed an appeal on Tuesday seeking to undo the election of his Democratic opponent under Maine's new voting system, asking the court to act quickly as the takeover of the new ones approaches. members of the US House of Representatives UU

Last week, a federal judge rejected the concerns of the US representative. UU Bruce Poliquin on the constitutionality of classified voting, a system used in November for the first time in a race in Congress.

Poliquin lost his candidacy for re-election to Democrat Jared Golden. Your appeal asks the United States First Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston to reconsider your request to nullify the election result and declare you the winner or order another election.

Poliquin says he should be the winner because he won the majority of the first place votes on election day. But Golden won the race in an additional round of voting in which two independents were eliminated and their votes were reassigned.

In his appeal, Poliquin states that voting by preference order "violated the constitutional rights of all voters." Poliquin says that the judge's rejection of his requests "avoided the explicit questions presented, often placing the questions at a more superficial level of analysis."

Meanwhile, Golden's chief of staff, Aisha Woodward, said the judge's decision was "very clear" and called it the "best response" to Poliquin's appeal.

Poliquin's appeal comes just weeks before Golden is sworn in on January 3.

But Congress does not have to wait for the litigation to end before deciding whether to swear to Golden, said Edward Foley, a professor of constitutional law at Ohio State University's law school. That decision is in the hands of the new House controlled by the Democrats, where the Democratic leader of the House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, earlier this month rebuked the fight of the Republicans against the election of rank and the victory of Golden.

"Congress does not have to be controlled by litigation to decide whether to fill the position of elected member," Foley said. "That is a decision that Congress finally takes for itself."

Another fight for a career in the House of Representatives has been brewing in North Carolina, where Republicans want their candidate to take their seat in Congress in a race not yet decided marked by accusations of fraud on the ballots.

But the fight there differs from Poliquin's demand, which has to do with concerns about the system that Maine uses to tabulate the winners.

According to the vote in order of preference, a system that Maine voters approved in 2016, all candidates are classified on the ballot, and the candidate who obtains the majority of the first-place votes is the winner. If there is no majority winner, the last-place candidates are eliminated and the second-choice votes are reassigned to the remaining field. The process is sometimes referred to as an instantaneous runoff.

Poliquin has criticized the vote for election of rank as so "confusing" that effectively does not deprive voters of rights.

Last week, the US District Judge. US, Lance Walker, said critics may question the wisdom of the classification vote, but that criticism "does not become constitutional impropriety." The judge rejected several of Poliquin's constitutional concerns and said the Constitution gives states a margin of maneuver to decide how to elect federal representatives.

Poliquin has also abandoned his request for a recount of Maine's election. The secretary of state's office said he is responsible for the "real cost" of the counting efforts.

Last year, the most important state court in Maine warned that classified voting conflicts with the state constitution, which says that the winners of state-level races are the ones who get the most votes, or a "plurality." . And so, Maine uses classified voting only in federal elections and state primary elections, but not for general elections for governor or the Legislature.

The elected Democratic governor, Janet Mills, promised to seek to amend the state constitution so that the system can be used in all elections.


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Exercise is as good as medicine to lower blood pressure – The Times https://tech2.org/exercise-is-as-good-as-medicine-to-lower-blood-pressure-the-times/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 05:18:56 +0000 https://tech2.org/exercise-is-as-good-as-medicine-to-lower-blood-pressure-the-times/

  1. Exercise as good as a medicine to lower blood pressure The Times
  2. Exercise could be as good as medications to reduce high blood pressure. The Telegraph
  3. Exercise can be as effective as prescription medications to lower high blood pressure Medical Xpress
  4. Swimming, walking or lifting weights in the gym "treats high blood pressure and medication" Daily Mail
  5. Exercise, as effective as medicines to lower blood pressure, finds a BMJ study Specialty in medical dialogues
  6. See full coverage in Google News

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Mary Poppins returns to defend songs & # 39; forgettable & # 39; https://tech2.org/mary-poppins-returns-to-defend-songs-39-forgettable-39-2/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 05:13:00 +0000 https://tech2.org/mary-poppins-returns-to-defend-songs-39-forgettable-39-2/

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Emily Mortimer, Emily Blunt and Colin Firth

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EPA

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From left to right: cast members Lin-Manuel Miranda, Emily Mortimer, Emily Blunt and Colin Firth

There is only one rule established for journalists in the press release of Mary Poppins Returns.

"Do not ask the cast to write Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious."

This point is pointed out by the publicists of the film twice more when we arrived, and it is clear that they are not kidding. Fortunately we think we can live with it.

Emily Blunt, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Emily Mortimer and director Rob Marshall are here to talk about the follow-up to the 1964 classic, which will be released in the UK this weekend.

Hollywood can be full of remakes of movies like A Star is Born, Tomb Raider and Ghostbusters, but Miranda insists that this is a different beast. It's a sequel, not a restart.

"That's an important distinction because we're not the ones trying to improve on Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious," he tells BBC News.

"You can not improve on that, and we know it. The goal is to have eight books per PL Travers, there are some amazing stories of Mary Poppins that have not hit the screen. "

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Jay Maidment

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Mary Poppins returns to take care of a new generation of Banks children.

Mary Poppins Returns is set in the 1930s in London, two decades after the original, with the famous nanny who returns to help care for a new generation of Banks children.

Arriving at theaters 54 years after its predecessor, the critics for the film have been mostly positive.

Robbie Collin, of the Telegraph, called it "practically perfect in every way" in his five-star rave, while Olly Richards of Empire said Blunt was "impeccably chosen as Poppins."

But some critics have focused on the soundtrack, suggesting that it is not up to the original.

"Mary Poppins Returns songs are almost incredibly forgettable," wrote Alissa Wilkinson on Vox. "I challenge you to play some of the melodies when you leave the theater."

The Hollywood Reporter acknowledged: "There is not a song as movingly memorable as Feed the Birds," though he praised The Place Where Lost Things Go for "conveying the underlying pain of the film with a comforting message of hope."

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false images

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Julie Andrews in the original 1964 with Dick Van Dyke, who makes a cameo in the sequel

The new score has been written by lyricist Scott Wittman and composer Marc Shaiman, who are best known for Hairspray.

Assuming composition tasks is not an easy task, considering that the original score of the Sherman brothers is considered one of the best for a screen musical.

"I think it's a fantastic score, I really do," says Marshall, who also directed the big screen musicals Chicago, Nine and Into the Woods. "We did not set out to make independent songs, because that does not work for a musical.

"What works for a musical is when they are integrated into the story, but I will say that they are so resourceful, so intelligent, so intelligent, and they are beautiful, so I think that the more people listen to the songs, the more they will be part of their lives "

Music with a message

They may be ingenious and ingenious, but could they really have the same longevity as the 1964 movie?

"I think so," says Mortimer, who plays children's aunt Jane. "I remember hearing the [new] soundtrack for the first time, and I was impressed.

"They were beautiful songs and they are songs that really stay in your head – and, like in the first movie, each song is incredibly ironic, fun and sophisticated, with the use of words and storytelling through the songs, and still A) Yes". We all have a pretty deep message about life and how to approach things. "

She adds: "I feel confident that the soundtrack will be a big part of people's lives for years to come."

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Disney

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Some critics have said that the role of Mary Poppins is restrictive for Emily Blunt

It seems that the musical branch of the Academy Awards agrees. When the long list of Oscars was revealed on Tuesday, Mary Poppins Returns was the only movie to have two songs in the race for the best original song.

Miranda believes that the songs will last, but adds: "Of course, only time will tell.

"I think it was an incredibly smart decision to hire [Wittman and Shaiman]… it's a love note for the first songs, I'm really proud to sing them. "

Leaving aside the music, most of the attention with the new film has focused on Blunt herself, who takes on the role that Dame Julie Andrews made famous.

She has received mostly positive reviews, but the BBC's art editor, Will Gompertz, said her performance "loses the brand," while others argued that the lead role is actually quite limiting for her.

& # 39; Stern & # 39; but & # 39; generous & # 39;

"For someone with his extraordinary range, the part is like a straitjacket," David Edelstein wrote in Vulture.

"Ordered to the children, her Mary puts a stern face and freezes her frown in place, then gives a little smile when they turn their backs, something she repeats with diminishing returns."

But Blunt responds to BBC News in response: "I do not see it just as something severe and all that, it's a woman with a coat of many colors, really, what I love about her is the duality she has."

"She's stern, she's buttoned up, she's ready, she's holding everything within her reach, but nevertheless, she has to be so generous to enter people's lives and inject it with fantasy and magic and a sense of wonder" .

Mary Poppins Returns is part of a resurgence of music on the big screen, something that Marshall welcomes.

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Lionsgate / 20th Century Fox / Warner

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More music on screen: La La Land, The Greatest Showman and A Star is Born

"I remember when I made Chicago years ago, they told me that the genre is dead because the public did not accept the people who sang on the screen," he recalls.

"But I think that gender is never the problem, but how it is handled, you must be very careful when you do a musical because a bad one does not work, but when it does, it feels created without problems, where you have a dialogue that moves perfectly in the song and return to the dialogue.

"I should feel like one path to tell a story I should not feel that a piece has been applied and pushed, it should feel like a natural and organic experience. "

For Miranda, best known for the creation of Hamilton, one of the most popular shows in the West End, the more musical they improve on the big screen.

"I think I'm really proud to be part of this resurgence, as someone who works very hard to make musicals, it's a victory for me," he says.

"And I also think it continues to resurface as we continue to innovate in our musicals.

"The Greatest Showman is different from A Star is Born, it's different from La La Land, it's different from Mary Poppins Returns, and I think as long as we keep pushing the boundaries of the types of stories we're supposed to tell, we can still enjoy this Renaissance ".


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Trump hits the tech giants by 'bias' after the reports that the Russians armed them for their benefit https://tech2.org/trump-hits-the-tech-giants-by-bias-after-the-reports-that-the-russians-armed-them-for-their-benefit/ Tue, 18 Dec 2018 14:22:55 +0000 https://tech2.org/trump-hits-the-tech-giants-by-bias-after-the-reports-that-the-russians-armed-them-for-their-benefit/





Donald Trump

President Donald Trump's remarks appear as reports have emerged that show the widespread use of social media by the Russian government, including Twitter, to bolster the Trump administration. | Yuri Gripas-Pool / Getty Images

President Donald Trump on Tuesday accused the main technology and social media platforms of harboring a bias towards Democrats, accusing Twitter of discouraging its followers on the platform just days after the publication of heartbreaking reports detailing government use. Russian social media to boost the president during and after his 2016 campaign.

"Facebook, Twitter and Google are so inclined towards the Democrats that it's ridiculous! "In fact, Twitter has made it much more difficult for people to join @realDonald Trump," he wrote in a tweet. "They have eliminated many names and have considerably reduced the level and speed of increase. They have not done ANYTHING recognized!

The story continues below

Conservatives have long accused technology platforms of suppressing their online ideology, allegations that companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google have denied. Google CEO Sundar Pichai faced the glaring question of Republicans in the House of Representatives last week during a testimony at the Capitol.

Trump's comments suggesting that Twitter is purposely hindering its followers on the platform it uses prolifically, reports emerge that show the widespread use of social networks by the Russian government, including Twitter, to reinforce the Trump administration and the campaign president's 2016 presidential election.

The new reports prepared for the Senate Intelligence Committee show that the Russian agents have carried out a campaign of great influence, publishing in all social media Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, owned by Google, Instagram, Reddit, Tumblr and Pinterest.

Reports claim that the Russian trolls farms carried out their campaign of influence not only during the 2016 elections, but also in the middle cycle of 2018, seeking to "undermine the confidence of citizens in government, exploit social fractures, create distrust in the information environment, blurring The lines between reality and fiction undermine trust between communities and erode confidence in the democratic process, "according to one of the reports.

The reports, and now Trump's comments, put technology giants such as Facebook, Twitter and Google from all sides of the political spectrum, after Facebook last week announced another security breach on the platform, the most recent in several data privacy scandals to Rock the company in recent years.


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3 patients died, 14 were diagnosed in outbreak of legionnaires at UW Health https://tech2.org/3-patients-died-14-were-diagnosed-in-outbreak-of-legionnaires-at-uw-health/ Tue, 18 Dec 2018 04:05:29 +0000 https://tech2.org/3-patients-died-14-were-diagnosed-in-outbreak-of-legionnaires-at-uw-health/

3 patients died, 14 were diagnosed in outbreak of legionnaires at UW Health

More headlines

MADISON, Wis. – Three patients who contracted Legionnaire's disease after an outbreak of the disease in UW Health died and the hospital confirmed a total of 14 cases during the outbreak.

The hospital said in a statement Monday that the three patients who died had serious health conditions that limited their lives. Ten patients who contracted the disease were discharged and are well, according to UW Health.

UW Health announced in late November that there were multiple cases of Legionnaire, a type of pneumonia caused by Legionella bacteria, and linked the outbreak to a change in its hot water system. The hospital cleaned the system with high levels of chlorine to kill the bacteria. A week later, the hospital discovered that the outbreak had affected 11 patients.

The hospital said Monday that the bacteria strain in the new Legionnaire cases combined the bacteria in the water system, but that the hyperchlorination has been effective.

"The tests carried out so far continue to show the expected reduction of the bacteria," the hospital wrote in a statement Monday. "UW Health will continue intensive monitoring of its water system to ensure patient safety."

The hospital said it is working with the CDC to review and analyze its work to respond to the problem. The report is expected to come out in about three months, according to the hospital.

Get your weather forecast from people who really live in your community. We update with short and easy-to-use video forecasts that you can see on your phone every day. Download the iOS or Android application here.


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Pterosaurs simply remain rarer https://tech2.org/pterosaurs-simply-remain-rarer-2/ Mon, 17 Dec 2018 17:41:11 +0000 https://tech2.org/pterosaurs-simply-remain-rarer-2/

Even experts often turn to the word "strange" when describing pterosaurs, the winged dragons that dominated the sky for more than 160 million years. This is especially true in the case of the group of short-tailed pterosaurs called anurognatids, which used to dart and jump through the forests of the Mesozoic era, like bats, looking for insects.

Now it seems that anurognatids and other pterosaurs may also have used an oddly varied layer of structures similar to feathers and skins, according to a new study published on Monday. Ecology of nature and evolution. A team led by paleontologist Zixiao Yang of Nanjing University in China came to that conclusion based on two specimens of almost complete pestosaurian anurognatids, the size of a pigeon, found in northern China.

The idea that pterosaurs (which lived approximately 228 million years ago until the extinction of the Cretaceous 66 million years ago) may have had some type of coat similar to the skin is not new in itself. Researchers have proposed it since the discovery of the first known pterosaurs in the 19th century. But the exact nature of this cover has been difficult to determine from the short structures, similar to filaments, called picnofibras, conserved in fossils of pterosaurs. The new study set out to fill that gap with the help of a battery of advanced technological tools. As a result, the authors characterize what they say are four different types of pycnofibers, distributed around the body of the animal in ways that suggest different types of pycnofiber that perform different functions: thermal insulation in the neck and head, for example, or reduction of the drag on the wings. A type of pycnofiber is a simple monofilament, similar to a hair. But three others appear to be branched in a way that the authors describe as "remarkably similar" to the feathers of birds. The similarities go beyond the form, or morphology, they say, to the similarity in the chemical and cellular levels.

Based on this finding, the study also argues that "the integumentary structures of feathered ramifications" may have evolved not first in dinosaurs, as was generally thought, but in some primordial archosaur, a common ancestor of pterosaurs and dinosaurs , including modern birds. This would mean that the ancestor even of dinosaurs decidedly not avian like Stegosaurus It could have been covered in feathers, instead of scales. It would also push the origin of the feathers out of the Jurassic period and retreated 60 million or 70 million years until the dawn of the Triassic period.

That early date for the appearance of the feathers would fit, says Michael Benton, lead author of the new study and paleontologist at the University of Bristol in England, with the transition from an extended posture to an upright and warm-blooded posture in many animals. groups, along with other evidence indicating "the pace of life accelerated" while the Triassic species struggled to recover from the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, in which 70 percent of terrestrial vertebrates had disappeared some 252 million years ago. years. It would also fit with the evidence that most of the genes that control the production of feathers were present in vertebrates before the origin of dinosaurs.

The counterargument, says Benton, is that great dinosaurs like it Stegosaurus or Brontosaurus The feathers were missing. But that is no stranger, he says, than elephants or whales that have little or no hair, although both evolved long after the evolution of hair in mammals.

In a commentary published in the same issue, behavioral ecologist Liliana D'Alba of the University of Ghent, Belgium, who was not involved in the new study, is skeptical. The study shows that the chemical composition of picnofibers is similar to that of feathers, he wrote, and both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy show that the fibers contain melanosomes, the same packets of pigments that impart color to feathers and mammals. hairs But the claim that some picnofibers are branched as feathers is based, she says, on the subjective interpretation of the "thick filament morphology", or shape. She points out that a previous attempt by other researchers to characterize picnofibras as feathers failed to persuade most paleontologists. It may require developments in other advanced technologies, he suggests, to solve the question.

"Does this work show that archosaur skin was more complex than we knew? Yes, "says Yale ornithologist Richard Prum, whose extensive knowledge of feathers was the basis of his award-winning book of 2017 The evolution of beauty. (Prum was not involved in the new study either). "Does it show that the archosaurs grew all kinds of interesting things on their skin? You bet All you have to do is look at a turkey beard to see that really new things can evolve into the skin of an archosaur." But Prum says the authors' grand conclusion is "wrong" because they ignore this evolutionary ability of novelty; just because the pterosaurs produced some strange structures like feathers does not automatically imply that the feathers have arisen in some common ancestor of the pterosaurs and dinosaurs. "These pterosaur skin appendages are great," says Prum, "but their branched structure is not homologous to that of the feathers," that is, they do not have a shared evolutionary origin. "And they probably are not homologs with feathers at all," he says. "In short, they are not feathers."

Most of them are not even spicy, says pterosaurs specialist David Unwin of the University of Leicester in England, who was not involved in the study. "These are fantastic specimens, and they did a brilliant job of getting images," he adds. But he argues that researchers are wrong when they use the keratin content to identify certain structures such as external picnofibers. Those structures, he says, are almost certainly pterosaur wing tissues called actinofibers, which can also contain keratin. None of the nine authors of the new study has experience with the preservation of soft tissues in pterosaurs; perhaps as a result, says Unwin, they do not refer to other relevant studies, for example, about the melanosomes of pterosaurs. His interpretation of the evidence, he adds, "is problematic, to say the least."

Benton challenges critics to show that "structures in pterosaurs are morphologically or chemically different from feathers." Meanwhile, he says, "we are having a parsimonious view" that they are actually feathers. He compares the new study with putting a kite: "We are establishing a hypothesis that can be tested."

Attempts to tear down that comet, by means of rhetorical shots, have begun.


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The incredible story of Susan Potter, the "immortal corpse" / Boing Boing https://tech2.org/the-incredible-story-of-susan-potter-the-immortal-corpse-boing-boing/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 17:41:02 +0000 https://tech2.org/the-incredible-story-of-susan-potter-the-immortal-corpse-boing-boing/

In the year 2000, Susan Potter, then 72 years old, donated her body to medicine. After Potter died, the scientists froze his corpse, cut it into 27,000 slivers thinner than a human hair, photographed each slice and created "the most advanced virtual corpse in the world using images of the highest quality of the entire human body in existence". The virtual corpse is not only an incredible achievement, but also the story of National Geographic about Potter and the principal investigator, Dr. Vic Spitzer Ph.D., director of the Center for Human Simulation at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Why? Because National Geographic followed this incredible story of the Visible Human Project for almost two decades, from before Potter died until the end of the simulation. Watch the documentary above. From National Geographic:

Are you interested in working with us before we die? (Spitzer) finally asked (Potter). Are you interested in giving us more than your body, in giving us your personality and knowledge?

Spitzer wanted to record it on video while he lived and record it talking about his life, his health, his medical history. His pathology is not so interesting for the project, Spitzer told Potter. But if you could capture it by talking to medical students, when you are looking at portions of your body, you could tell them about your spine: why did not you want the surgery, what kind of pain caused the surgery and what kind of life you took after the surgery? surgery. That would be fascinating.

"They will see your body while they listen to your stories," she explained, adding that the video and audio of her would make her more real and introduce the element of emotion to the students. Instead of an anonymous corpse, this "visible human" would be able to deliver a medical narrative full of memories of frustration, pain and disappointment. Potter images, like those of visible human beings, would be on the Internet, available anywhere, at any time.

Susan Potter had signed to be an immortal corpse.

"Susan Potter will live forever" (National Geographic)


image: VIC SPITZER, JOHN MAGBY, AND RACHEL KLAUS, TECHNOLOGIES OF THE TOUCH OF LIFE

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David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is the co-editor of Boing Boing. On Instagram, he is @pesco.

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The incredible story of Susan Potter, the "immortal corpse" / Boing Boing https://tech2.org/the-incredible-story-of-susan-potter-the-immortal-corpse-boing-boing/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 17:41:02 +0000 https://tech2.org/the-incredible-story-of-susan-potter-the-immortal-corpse-boing-boing/

In the year 2000, Susan Potter, then 72 years old, donated her body to medicine. After Potter died, the scientists froze his corpse, cut it into 27,000 slivers thinner than a human hair, photographed each slice and created "the most advanced virtual corpse in the world using images of the highest quality of the entire human body in existence". The virtual corpse is not only an incredible achievement, but also the story of National Geographic about Potter and the principal investigator, Dr. Vic Spitzer Ph.D., director of the Center for Human Simulation at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Why? Because National Geographic followed this incredible story of the Visible Human Project for almost two decades, from before Potter died until the end of the simulation. Watch the documentary above. From National Geographic:

Are you interested in working with us before we die? (Spitzer) finally asked (Potter). Are you interested in giving us more than your body, in giving us your personality and knowledge?

Spitzer wanted to record it on video while he lived and record it talking about his life, his health, his medical history. His pathology is not so interesting for the project, Spitzer told Potter. But if you could capture it by talking to medical students, when you are looking at portions of your body, you could tell them about your spine: why did not you want the surgery, what kind of pain caused the surgery and what kind of life you took after the surgery? surgery. That would be fascinating.

"They will see your body while they listen to your stories," she explained, adding that the video and audio of her would make her more real and introduce the element of emotion to the students. Instead of an anonymous corpse, this "visible human" would be able to deliver a medical narrative full of memories of frustration, pain and disappointment. Potter images, like those of visible human beings, would be on the Internet, available anywhere, at any time.

Susan Potter had signed to be an immortal corpse.

"Susan Potter will live forever" (National Geographic)


image: VIC SPITZER, JOHN MAGBY, AND RACHEL KLAUS, TECHNOLOGIES OF THE TOUCH OF LIFE

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David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is the co-editor of Boing Boing. On Instagram, he is @pesco.

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The executives begged Kathie Lee Gifford to stay in "Today" https://tech2.org/the-executives-begged-kathie-lee-gifford-to-stay-in-today-3/ Wed, 12 Dec 2018 03:26:59 +0000 https://tech2.org/the-executives-begged-kathie-lee-gifford-to-stay-in-today-3/

Kathie Lee Gifford wanted to leave the "Today" program a year ago, Page Six has learned.

Sources tell us that Gifford, who announced on Tuesday he will leave the NBC program after 11 years, went to executives in the fall of 2017 and said she was ready to resign.

But network experts tell us that the NBC News news channel begged him to stay another year because the alignment of the important morning program was in turmoil, and they wanted to maintain as much continuity as possible.

Executives even said goodbye to Gifford taking a lot of time to make movies and record music, so she would stay.

When Gifford initially raised his resignation with his bosses, Matt Lauer had just been expelled from the "Today" show amid accusations of sexual misconduct. Megyn Kelly's hesitation was sending shockwaves through the franchise, and at the same time, fans still felt the absence of favorite Tamron Hall.

So we are told that Gifford was offered a good deal to stay for 11 years as co-host of the beloved and crushing fourth hour of "Today" with Hoda Kotb.

On Tuesday, Gifford announced on the air that he was going to concentrate on his film career.

Meanwhile, the sources tell Page Six that Jenna Bush Hager is the favorite to take over Gifford.

We are told that Hager has become popular with viewers and the bosses of NBC News, and he is expected to assume the role of Gifford when he leaves on his 11th anniversary in April 2019.

After announcing his departure from the show on Tuesday morning, Gifford said: "I know someone wonderful will be sitting in this seat later." And, "I have my idea of ​​who could be absolutely wonderful."

Hager has been a frequent presence on the show and joined Kotb during the summer when Gifford was in Scotland filming a movie he also wrote.


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