blood pressure: people would prefer to drink tea or take a pill rather than exercise to lower high blood pressure

WASHINGTON D.C. (USA): According to a recent study, people would prefer to take a pill or drink tea than exercise to treat high blood pressure.

The researchers wanted to discover how people weigh the benefits of high blood pressure treatment options against their inconvenience.

They asked respondents to imagine they had high blood pressure and then asked if they were willing to take any of the four "treatments" to gain a month, year or five additional years of life.

In this survey, the proposed "treatments" were: a daily cup of tea, exercise, pills or monthly or semi-annual injections.

 People would prefer to drink tea or take a pill than exercise to lower high blood pressure

The results showed that taking a pill or drinking a cup of tea a day was the preferred treatment, although some were unwilling to take any action, even if that meant earning an additional year or five years of life.

For each treatment, participants were more likely to say that they would adopt it if the benefit were greater:

-79% of respondents said they would be willing to take a pill for an additional month of life, 90% for an additional year of life and 96% for an additional five years of life;

-78 percent said they would drink a cup of tea per day for an extra month of life, 91 percent would drink for an additional year of life and 96 percent would drink it for an additional five years of life;

-63 percent would be willing to exercise for an additional month of life, 84 percent would do so for an additional year of life, and 93 percent would exercise if that meant an additional five years of life;

 People would prefer to drink tea or take a pill than exercise to lower high blood pressure

-One shot was the least preferred of the options: 68 percent would take an injection every six months if it gave them an extra month of life, 85 percent would do it for an additional year of life and 93 percent the penny would be willing if granted another five years, but only half (51%) would receive a monthly injection for an extra month of life, 74% would do it for an additional year and 88% would opt for an injection every month if I gave them five additional years of life.

In addition, at least 20 percent of the respondents wanted to make gains in life expectancy beyond what any of the individual interventions could provide.

"Our findings show that people badign different weights to the advantages and disadvantages of interventions to improve cardiovascular health," said Erica Spatz, lead author of the study and badistant professor at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT.

The preliminary investigation was presented at the Scientific Sessions of Quality Research and Care of the American Heart Association 2018.

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