Bird holds the record for the longest nonstop flight at 7,500 miles from Alaska to New Zealand


It was on a wing and a prayer.

A small bird has set a major record for the longest nonstop flight in recorded history, the Guardian reported.


A bird standing on the edge of a body of water: a bar-tailed godwit, but not the bar-tailed godwit that made record-setting flight.


© Shutterstock
Bar-tailed Godwit, but not The Bar-tailed Godwit that made a record-setting flight.


Bar-tailed Godwit, but not The Bar-tailed Godwit, which made a record-setting flight. (Shutterstock /)

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According to the Guardian, the bar-tailed Godwit left Alaska on 16 September and landed in New Zealand 11 days later. The satellite-tracked bird traveled an estimated 7,580 miles.

Bar-tailed Godwits is a veteran of long-haul flight, which they make twice a year. Named by a special group named 4BBRW, this particular bird traveled a longer way than usual because of east-to-west winds, which pushed it towards Australia and forced an in-flight adjustment, the Guardian reported.

“They go to New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea where there are quite a few islands and, we may be anthropologists, but it really feels like they start thinking about the land and the kind of, ‘Oh, start dearing me Need or I’ll remember New Zealand, “bird-tracking scientist Jesse Conklin told the Guardian.

Scientists do not believe that the gods eat or sleep during their trans-Pacific journey. The smaller birds, which weigh an average of 10 ounces, are “designed like a jet fighter,” said Cochlin. According to the Guardian, the record-setting Godwit hit a top speed of 55 mph.

The previous record for the longest nonstop avian flight was about 7,200 miles, set in 2007 by a separate Godwit.

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