Bermuda fully in the eye of Hurricane Paulette as Hurricane Lash Island


The entire island of Bermuda was under the eye of Hurricane Paulette on Monday morning, as the storm triggered another damaging winds and torrential rain as it began to move away.

The US National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said Paulette was located just above Bermuda around 6 a.m. before the storm began to slowly fade away.

“The storm conditions and torrential rains associated with the southern eye continue over Bermuda,” NHC said.

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According to NHC, Paulet’s eye donation will continue to pass over Bermuda during the next few hours.

Satellite imagery showed the island perfectly in the middle of the eye of the storm early Monday, surrounded by thick clouds from all around.

Bermuda Island can be seen directly in the eye of Hurricane Paulette on Monday September 14, 2020.
(NOAA / goes pre)

Those in the island reported that “light winds” in the eye, as “singing of tree frogs” continue to roam the surf.

Andrew Moore wrote on Twitter that he could still see “some stars and planets” even after clearing the clouds.

Paulette is currently a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph, with a high gust, moving north-east at a speed of 13 mph.

“Additional strengthening is likely from Tuesday night as Paulette intensifies north-east towards east-northeast,” NHC said. “Gradual weakening is forecast to begin on Wednesday.”

As the storm moves away from Bermuda, storm conditions will return from the south and southeast passing over the southern island.

Up to 6 inches of rain is possible on the island, with storm conditions prevailing until mid-morning, tropical storm conditions persisting until noon.

As the storm receded, some people on the island described the “still raging” situation.

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Paulette may be over Bermuda, but the storm is causing bumpy seas that will affect the entire east coast of the United States. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are possible on Monday.

In addition to Paulette, Sally is gaining strength as it takes aim at the US Gulf Coast as a storm.

Once a tropical storm, René will spread on Monday. There is no danger on the ground.

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on 14, 2020.

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on 14, 2020.

Tropical Depression 20 strengthened on Monday morning in Tropical Storm Teddy, and it was expected to become a “powerful” storm later in the week. The storm is forecast to remain in the Central Atlantic over the next five days with no threat to the US.

Another disturbance off the coast of Africa, Tropical Depression 21, formed Monday in the eastern part of the Atlantic Ocean before strengthening Tropical Storm Vicky.

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Historically, September produces the most Atlantic Ocean basin tropical activity. Current-name storms have quickly broken records for their respective letter, a trend that continues during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

The busiest month of the storm is September, with activity peaking on 10 September.

The busiest month of the storm is September, with activity peaking on 10 September.
(Fox News)

NOAA forecasts are now calling for storms of up to 25 names with winds of 39 mph or more; Of those, seven to 10 storms may form. In those storms, there will be three to six major ones, which will be classified as category 3, 4 and 5 and with winds of 111 mph or more.

Where tropical storms generally develop during the month of September.

Where tropical storms generally develop during the month of September.
(Fox News)

This is far above an average year. Based on data from 1981 to 2010, there are 12 hurricanes, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

So far this year, there have been 19 storms, of which six are hurricanes and one of them is major storm.

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The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30 and includes Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edoard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulé, René . , Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred.

Name for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

Name for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.
(Fox News)

There is only one more name left for this season: Wilfred. After that, we will move to the Greek alphabet for only the second time in history.

Fox News’ Adam Klotz and Brandon Noriega contributed to this report.