Being ALONE during middle age can increase your risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life.


Being ALONE during middle age may increase risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life, study warns

  • The scientists examined data from cognitively ‘normal’ adults in the US.
  • Those who were persistently alone between the ages of 45 and 64 were more likely to develop dementia
  • However, people who only felt temporarily lonely had a lower risk
  • While the reason for the findings remains unclear, the researchers hope their research will help tailor interventions to prevent loneliness.

Being constantly alone during middle age can increase your risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life, a new study revealed.

Researchers studied older people in the US to understand whether they consistently felt lonely between the ages of 45 and 64.

Their analysis revealed that those who felt lonely in middle age were more likely to develop dementia or Alzheimer’s.

However, people who have recovered from loneliness appear to be less likely to suffer from dementia than those who never felt lonely.

While the reason for the findings remains unclear, the researchers hope their research will help tailor interventions to prevent loneliness.

Being constantly alone during middle age can increase your risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s later in life, a new study has revealed.

Loneliness in the UK

In 2018, a report by Age UK found that the number of people over 50 suffering from loneliness will hit two million in 2025/6.

This compares with around 1.4 million in 2016/7, a 49 percent increase in 10 years.

Age UK Charities Director Caroline Abrahams said: ‘Our population is aging quite fast, so we are heading to have two million lonely over 50s in less than a decade, with dire consequences for their physical health. and mental, and therefore for the NHS, unless we act now ”.

Source: Age UK

Loneliness is not currently listed as a clinical illness, however research has shown that it is linked to a variety of negative health outcomes, including trouble sleeping, depression, and even stroke.

In the study, researchers from Boston University set out to understand whether loneliness could also affect people’s risk for neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The team examined data from cognitively “ normal ” adults from the Framingham Heart Study, which has been recruiting participants since 1948.

Specifically, the team investigated whether persistent loneliness more strongly predicted the future development of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease than transient loneliness.

Several other factors were also taken into account, such as age, gender, education, social network, living alone, physical health and genetic risk.

The findings revealed that people who felt lonely persistently had a higher risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease 18 years later.

However, people who only felt lonely for a short period of time actually had a lower risk of developing either condition.

Dr. Wendy Qiu, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at Boston University and corresponding author of the study, explained: “ While persistent loneliness is a threat to brain health, psychological resilience after adverse life experiences may explain why transitory loneliness is protective in the context of the onset of dementia.

The researchers hope the findings will spark hope for people who may suffer from loneliness amid the Covid-19 pandemic, but they believe they could overcome this sentiment when the lockdown is eased.

While the reason for the findings remains unclear, they raise concern for the millions of Britons who admit to feeling alone.

The researchers hope the findings will spark hope for people who may suffer from loneliness amid the Covid-19 pandemic, but believe they could overcome this sentiment when the lockdown is eased (file image)

The researchers hope the findings will spark hope for people who may suffer from loneliness amid the Covid-19 pandemic, but believe they could overcome this sentiment when the lockdown is eased (file image)

In 2018, a report by Age UK found that the number of people over 50 suffering from loneliness will hit two million in 2025/6.

This compares with around 1.4 million in 2016/7, a 49 percent increase in 10 years.

Age UK Charities Director Caroline Abrahams said: ‘Our population is aging quite fast, so we are heading to have two million lonely over 50s in less than a decade, with dire consequences for their physical health. and mental, and therefore for the NHS, unless we act now ”.

WHAT IS DEMENTIA? THE KILLER’S DISEASE THAT STEALS FROM THOSE WHO SUFFER ITS MEMORIES

Dementia is a general term used to describe a variety of neurological disorders.

Dementia is a general term used to describe a variety of neurological disorders.

A GLOBAL CONCERN

Dementia is a general term used to describe a variety of progressive neurological disorders (those that affect the brain) that affect memory, thinking, and behavior.

There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common.

Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.

Regardless of the type that is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in a unique way.

Dementia is a global concern, but it is seen most often in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live to a very old age.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE AFFECTED?

The Alzheimer’s Society reports that there are over 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, of whom over 500,000 have Alzheimer’s.

The number of people living with dementia in the UK by 2025 is estimated to rise to over 1 million.

In the United States, there are an estimated 5.5 million Alzheimer’s sufferers. A similar percentage increase is expected in the coming years.

As a person’s age increases, so does their risk of developing dementia.

Diagnosis rates are improving, but it is believed that many people with dementia have not yet been diagnosed.

IS THERE A CURE?

There is currently no cure for dementia.

But new drugs can slow its progression, and the earlier it is detected, the more effective the treatments.

Source: Alzheimer’s Society

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