Astronomers first detect potential radio emission from exoplanet


In this artistic rendering of the Tau Boots’ B system, lines representing the invisible magnetic field are shown protecting the planet Jupiter from the solar wind. Sincerely: Jack Madden / Cornell University

By monitoring the universe with a radio telescope array, an international team of scientists have detected a radio burst emanating from planetary boites – the first radio emissions collected from a planet beyond our solar system.

Cornell postdoctoral researcher Jake D. Turner, Philippe Zerca of the Observatoire de Paris – the team led by Jean-Matthias Grismeier of the Universities of Paris Sciences at Lettres and Universities, d. D. Will publish its findings in the upcoming research section of Arequans Astronomy and Astrophysics, On 16 December (2020).

“We present one of the first signs of detection exoplanet In the radio realm, “Turner said.” The signal is from the Tau Boits system, which consists of a binary star and an exoplanet. We make a case for emission by the planet itself. By the strength and polarization of the radio signal and the planet’s magnetic field, This is consistent with theoretical predictions. “

The co-authors are Turner’s postdoctoral advisor Ray Jayawardhan, Harold Tanner Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of astronomy.

“If this is confirmed through follow-up comments,” Jayawardhan said, this radio discovery opens a new window on Exoplanet, giving us a new way to investigate foreign worlds that are tens of light years away. “


By monitoring the universe with a radio telescope array, an international team of scientists has detected a radio burst emanating from planetary boites – the first radio emissions collected from a planet beyond our solar system. Cornell postdoctoral researcher Jake D. Turner research suggests. Credit: Ryan Macdonald / Carl Sagan Institute

Using a low-frequency array (LOFAR), a radio telescope in the Netherlands, Turner and his colleagues exposed emission bursts from a star-system hosting a so-called hot. Jupiter, A gaseous giant planet that is very close to its sun. The group also overviewed 55 potential canary (in constellation cancer) and other potential exoplanetary radio-emission candidates in the Apesilon Andromede system. Only the Tao Booits exoplanet system – about 51 light years away – an important radio signature, a unique potential window on the planet’s magnetic field.

Observing an exoplanet’s magnetic field helps astronomers understand the internal and atmospheric properties of a planet, as well as the physics of star-planet interactions, Turner said, a member of Cornell’s Carl Sagan Institute.

Earth’s magnetic field avoids the dangers of solar wind, making the planet habitable. “The magnetic field of an exoplanet like Earth can contribute to their potential habitat potential,” Turner said, protecting their own atmospheres from solar wind and cosmic rays, and protecting the planet from atmospheric damage. “

Two years ago, Turner and his colleagues investigated Jupiter’s radio emission signature and extended those emissions to mimic potential signatures from distant Jupiter-like exoplanets. Those results became the template for the discovery of radio emissions from exoplanet 40 to 100 light years away.

After nearly 100-hours of radio observation, the researchers were able to find the expected hot Jupiter signature in the Tau Boites. “We learned from our own Jupiter what it feels like to have this kind of detection. We went looking for it and we found it, ”said Turner.

The signature, however, is weak. “There remains some uncertainty as to whether the radio signal is from the planet. The need for follow-up comments is important, ”he said.

Turner and his team have already started operations using several radio telescopes to follow up on the signal from Tau Boites.

Reference: J.D. Turner, p. Zarka, J.-M. By “Exploring Radio Emissions from Exoplanetary Systems 55 Canary, Upsilon Andromede, and Tao Boitis using LFAR Beam-Created Observations”. Grismeier, J. Lazio, b. Cecconi, J.E. Enriquez, J.N. Girard, R. Jayawardhana, L. Lamy, JD Nichols and I. Pater, 16 December 2020, Astronomy and Astrophysics.
DOI: 10.1051 / 0004-6361 / 201937201

In addition to Turner, Jayawardhan, Grismeier, and Jarka, the co-authors are the Observatoire de Paris, Laurent Lamy of France, and the Baptist Cecconi; Josef Lazio NASAJet Propulsion Laboratory; J. Emilio Enriquez and Ime de Pater the Se University of California, Berkeley; Julian n. From Girard Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; And Jonathan D. Nicholas from the University of Leicester, United Kingdom.

Turner, who formed the basis of this research while earning a doctorate at the University of Virginia, received funding from the National Science Foundation.

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