As a coronavirus virus, only 2 states are moving in the right direction


There is almost no place in the US where the Kovid-19 case count is headed in the right direction as health experts in the country say the epidemic will be the most challenging months.


One person standing next to a car: Health care workers perform COVID-19 testing on October 9, 2020 at a drive-through site in Palm Bay, Florida.  The Florida Department of Health reports that COVID-19 cases, deaths and hospitalizations are on the rise, while US President Donald Trump plans to hold a rally in Sanford, Florida after contracting the disease.  (Photo by Paul Hennessy / NurPhoto via AP)


© Paul Hennessy / NURPHO / Associated Press
Health care workers conduct COVID-19 testing on October 9, 2020 at a drive-through site in Palm Bay, Florida. The Florida Department of Health reports that COVID-19 cases, deaths and hospitalizations are on the rise, while US President Donald Trump plans to hold a rally in Sanford, Florida after contracting the disease. (Photo by Paul Hennessy / NurPhoto via AP)


The US has averaged more than 60,000 new cases per day since the dip in mid-September – and experts say the country is in the midst of an alarming decline. The US reported the most infections on a single day on Friday after July. According to Johns Hopkins University, as of Saturday, more than 8.1 million cases of the virus had been reported in the US and 219,286 people had died.

Only Missouri and Vermont reported more than 10% improvement in the average number of reported cases in the previous week, according to university data. On the other hand, cases increased by 50% or more in Connecticut and Florida.

Spikes were observed between 10% and 50% in twenty-seven states: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

New cases are stable in the remaining states.

“It’s a really annoying time, and people have to be careful,” epidemiologist Dr. Abdul al-Saeed said.

‘This boom is likely to worsen’

According to Johns Hopkins, on Friday, 10 states reported their highest one-day counts: Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

As the infection progresses, so do hospitalizations. In New Mexico, hospitalization has increased by 101% in this month.

Director of the National Institutes of Health, Drs. Francis Collins said daily coronavirus deaths would increase more.

Although the average of 1,000 US coronovirus deaths in July and August is less than the daily toll of 1,000, researchers at the University of Washington estimate that more than 2,300 Americans may die daily by mid-January.

“When we first saw such broadcasts in an epidemic, in March and April, the virus was not sown everywhere. … This boom is likely to worsen compared to either spring or summer.” “El-Sayed, Detroit’s former health director, said.

State leaders impose new restrictions

The virus can help keep Americans under control, experts say, with guidelines being deferred for months by authorities: avoiding crowded settings, keeping distance, keeping small gatherings out, and wearing masks.

“This is a good moment for people to stop themselves and ask: ‘What can I do to make sure that we limit further infections that would otherwise be kicking in front of us in cold weather and people coming home?’ Are in., And those curves are going upward, in the wrong direction? ‘”Collins said on Friday.

Upsticks have prompted state leaders to pursue new restrictions, including facade enforcement and limits of ceremonies, in hopes of curbing the spread.

Nebraska Gov. Pete Rickets announced changes to state health measures requiring hospitals to reserve at least 10% of normal and ICU beds for Kovid-19 patients.

In Kentucky, Gov. Andy Beshear said that this month he directed officials to step into mask enforcement, and in New Mexico, the governor this week set aside 10 a.m. time for new mass gathering boundaries and alcohol serving establishments. Ordered.

“Every new Mexican must do his part to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by staying in the house, limiting his interactions with others, and wearing his mask,” Grisham tweeted.

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