Artificial intelligence chips & # 39; mental control & # 39; can alter a person’s moods



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The US Army UU He has begun testing artificial intelligence implants that can change the mood of a person in humans.

These chips & # 39; mental control & # 39; They emit electronic pulses that alter brain chemistry in a process called "deep brain stimulation."

If successful, the devices could be used to treat a range of mental health conditions and to ensure a better response to therapy.

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  Mind control chips developed by the US Army. UU They could be used to control their mood, after human trials began for the first time. The microchips implanted in the skulls of people emit electronic pulses that alter brain chemistry, in a process called

  Mind control chips developed by the US military. UU They can be used to control your mood. the first time. The microchips implanted in the skulls of people emit electronic pulses that alter brain chemistry, in a process called

The mind control chips developed by the armed forces of the United States. UU They can be used to control your mood. the first time. The microchips implanted in the skulls of people emit electronic pulses that alter brain chemistry, in a process called "deep brain stimulation."

WHAT IS DEEP CEREBRAL STIMULATION?

Deep brain simulation involves the implantation of thin wires, with electrodes at their tips, in the brain.

These are connected to extensions that move under the skin behind the ear and down the neck.

The electrodes provide a high frequency shock to a specific area in the brain.

This stimulation changes some of the electrical signals in the brain to change behavior or movement.

Deep brain simulation has been used to treat movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, but has so far been less successful in the treatment of mood disorders.

The chips are the work of scientists from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a branch of the United States Department of Defense that develops new technologies for the army.

Researchers at the University of California (UC) and Mbadachusetts General Hospital (MGH) designed them to use artificial intelligence algorithms that detect patterns of activity badociated with mood disorders.

Once detected, they can return the patient's brain to a healthy state automatically.

Experts believe that chips could be beneficial for patients with a variety of diseases, from Parkinson's disease to chronic depression.

Edward Chang, a neuroscientist at the University of California, said: "We have learned a lot about the limitations of our current technology.

& # 39; The most exciting thing about these technologies is that for the first time we will have a window in the brain where we know what is happening in the brain when someone relapses. "

The chips were tested on six people who have epilepsy and already have electrodes implanted in their brains to track their attacks.

Through these electrodes, researchers were able to track what was happening in their brains during the day.

The older implants do it constantly, but the new approach allows the team to administer a shock when necessary. [19659002] By tracking the brain activity of a patient over the course of one to three weeks, they were able to create an algorithm to & # 39; decode & # 39; your moods

  The devices could be used to treat a series of mental health conditions and to ensure a better response to therapy. Experts believe that the chips could be beneficial for patients with a variety of diseases, from Parkinson's disease to chronic depression (magnetic resonance stock images)

. The devices could be used to treat a range of mental health conditions and ensure a better response to therapy. Experts believe that the chips could be beneficial for patients with a variety of diseases, from Parkinson's disease to chronic depression (stock images magnetic resonance imaging)

The devices could be used to treat a range of mental health conditions and ensure a better response to therapy Experts believe that the chips could be beneficial for patients with a variety of diseases, from the disease Parkinson's up to chronic depression (MRI stock images)

The MGH team discovered that by administering discharges to the regions of the brain that deal with decisions, decisions and emotions, the participants performed significantly better in the established tasks.

This included the combination of number images or the identification of emotions on the faces.

Difficulties with concentration and problems with empathy are characteristic of a variety of mood disorders.

Although researchers will not be able to read people's minds, chips do pose a number of ethical concerns.

Alik Widge, the engineering director of the MGH team, added: "We will have access to the activity that encodes their feelings."

Dr. Widge's group is working with neuroethicists to address the moral implications of their work.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Nature.

HUMAN TESTS

The chips were tested on people who have epilepsy and already have electrodes implanted in their brains to track their attacks, by the UC team.

Through these electrodes, researchers can track what's happening in the brain while using the splinters to stimulate the brain.

The older implants do it constantly, but the new approach allows the team to electrocute the brain when necessary

By tracking a patient's brain activity over the course of one to three weeks, they were able to create an algorithm to & # 39; decode & # 39; your mood.

In separate tests, the MGH team discovered that by delivering to the brain regions involved in decision-making and emotions, participants performed significantly better on established tasks.

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