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Architecture students imagine a lunar base with the European Space Agency



Architecture students imagine a lunar base with the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency has joined a group of architecture students to speculate on the future design of sustainable lunar habitats. From the ESA astronaut center in Cologne, Germany, the organization challenged students to draw in extreme environments in remote locations, and speculate on the procurement and production of materials on the Moon to build a sustainable habitat.

Taking into account the sunlight, temperature and terrain, the design team developed a system of inflatable modules that can land at the base of a small crater in the South Polar Region of the Moon, where they will gradually fill the cavity with soil lunar until the modules are effectively buried.


© ESA

© ESA


The structures are intended to protect the inhabitants from external conditions on the lunar surface. Due to the lack of a protective atmosphere, the base would also need to protect humans from radiation and from small meteorites. To achieve this, the shield meters protect the base, while the crater offers natural isolation, protection and stable temperatures.


© ESA

© ESA


The scheme was developed by the ESA Spaceship EAC initiative, created to promote collaboration and networking through partnerships with universities and research organizations. Promoting an interdisciplinary approach to design, the team of architecture students joined aerospace engineers and biologists.

The vision comes at a time of greater interest among the architectural community for the potential to establish settlements on other planets and moons. Recently, NASA approved AI SpaceFactory's vision for 3D printed cabins on Mars, while Foster + Partners showed its vision of extraterrestrial habitats at the Goodwood Festival in the UK.

News through: European Space Agency.

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