Another Boeing flight was forced to make an emergency landing in Utah after possible engine problems


Another Boeing scare on a plane full of passengers 30,000 feet in the air.

A Delta Air Lines flight from Atlanta to Seattle was diverted to Salt Lake City as a precaution on Monday following a warning indicating a possible problem with one of the Boeing 757’s engines.

A Delta spokesperson told FOX News that Flight 2123 “landed safely without incident and proceeded to the gate without assistance” at Salt Lake City International Airport.

“We are working to re-accommodate customers on a later flight,” the airline added. “We apologize for the delay and any inconvenience.”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that there were 128 people aboard the Boeing 757 and no injuries were reported.

NTSB PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION IN UNITED FLIGHT WITH EXPLOTING ENGINE REVEALS DAMAGE TO THE FAN BLADE

The emergency landing comes just days after an airborne explosion forced a Boeing 777 aircraft traveling from Denver to Honolulu to make an emergency landing.

After its right engine failed and burst into flames, United Flight 328 rapidly lost altitude and dropped huge chunks of the engine housing and chunks of fiberglass into the northern Colorado neighborhoods below. Authorities said no injuries were reported among the 231 passengers and 10 crew members aboard the plane or on the ground where debris fell.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the incident.

FAA DEMANDS AN EMERGENCY INSPECTION OF SELECT BOEING 777s AFTER THE MIDAIR EXPLOSION RIPPED THE ENGINE TO PARTS

On Sunday, Federal Aviation Administrator Steve Dickson directed the agency’s aviation security experts to issue an Emergency Airworthiness Directive, requiring “immediate or intensified inspections of Boeing 777 aircraft equipped with certain Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines. “.

Boeing recommended “suspending operations of the 69 777s in service and 59 in storage powered by Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engines until the FAA identifies the appropriate inspection protocol.”

Pratt & Whitney added in a statement that it is “actively coordinating with operators and regulators to support the revised inspection interval for the Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines that power Boeing 777 aircraft.”

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United Airlines, the only US carrier with the type of engine in its fleet, said it would ground the affected planes immediately.

“Starting immediately and with great caution, we are voluntarily and temporarily removing 24 Boeing 777 aircraft powered by Pratt & Whitney 4000 series engines from our program,” a United spokesperson told FOX News in a statement. “As we trade aircraft, we expect only a small number of customers to be inconvenienced.”

In addition to its 24 active aircraft, United has an additional 28 Boeing 777s in storage.

“Safety remains our top priority, for our employees and our customers,” the spokesperson added. “That is why our pilots and flight attendants participate in extensive training to prepare for and manage incidents such as United Flight 328. And we remain proud of their professionalism and strong dedication to safety in our daily operations and when they occur. emergencies like this. “

The FAA said it was also aware that the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau has ordered operators equipped with this type of engine to stop flying in Japan until further notice. A Japan Airlines flight that took off from Naha Airport in Okinawa to Haneda Airport in Tokyo made an emergency landing over a similar engine problem on the Boeing 777 in December.

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