Airline pilots returning to sky after lockdown are committing ‘mistakes’


A NASA watchman reported that dozens of US airline pilots have reported making ‘mistakes’ as the epidemic caused ‘war’ after returning to the sky after lockdown.

Air travel has been its lowest demand in decades as a result of COVID-19, which led to the closure of many international flights as countries tried to curb the virus.

Now pilots who have gone back to the captain’s seat have told the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System that they have been making dozens of ‘mistakes’ since May as they have been out of practice.

Errors include forgetting to turn off the parking brake, making three attempts to land the aircraft on a windy day, choosing the wrong runway, and forgetting to turn on an anti-icing mechanism that freezes altitude and airspeed sensors. Stops.

So far, there have been no incidents of out-of-practice pilots causing injury to passengers.

While aviation experts say they believe in the safety of flights they warn of requiring pilots returning to work months later to receive additional training sessions, some American airlines would begin providing it Huh.

Dozens of pilots have told NASA’s anonymous aviation safety reporting system that they have ‘made mistakes’ due to ‘rust’ as a result of reduced flights during the epidemic. The picture is a Boeing 767-323 cargo jet that flies from Los Angeles International Airport on 13 January 2021. It is not clear which airlines the pilots flew for

Richard McSpadden, senior vice president of the Air Safety Institute of the Association of Aircraft Owners and Pilots, said 'frequency' is the key to safety in flight.

Kenneth P., chairman of the Department of Flight Training at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.  Byrnes said that commercial passenger jets always fly with the pilot and co-pilot to reduce the odds of pilot error.

Aviation experts say they are confident of providing additional training to pilots’ skills and months after lockdown

One officer, who had not switched on his de-icing system, told NASA’s watchdog: ‘Because I hadn’t flown in a few months, I was rusted. I felt that my recall was sufficiently strong, but in fact I should have taken some time to review standard operating procedures, as reported by The Los Angeles Times.

Another pilot accidentally set the line to land on the wrong runway, while a different pilot mistakenly deactivated the autopilot and an first officer abnormally parked the equipment in the cockpit after it was incorrectly mounted.

In each case, the pilots and first officers blamed the errors when they were out of practice.

In September, a first officer aboard a commercial jet misjudged the distance to the runway during the landing and landed the aircraft too short. Instead of landing and circling the airport for another try – the safest option – the first officer made a last-minute adjustment to the landing.

The first official said, “Factors that contributed included light turbulence for continuous power adjustment,”.

He said: ‘Also, the recent flight time shortage due to taking a vacation – this was my first approach / landing in several weeks with very limited flight time in the last six months.’

During an incident in October when a pilot forgot to take a parking brake, he said ‘it’s been 40 days since my last flight’.

He said: ‘We are flying low, so we need to be more attentive. Better attention to detail. ‘

NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System Was developed so that pilots and other airline crew members could anonymously report mechanical glare and human errors without fear of retaliation from airplane manufacturers or airline management.

International and domestic flights collapsed, and in the case of some destinations, completely closed last year.  Once they were back in the air to make many pilots feel out of practice.  The picture shows a JetBlue Airways airbus A320-232 landing from Los Angeles International Airport on January 13, 2021

International and domestic flights went awry, and in the case of some destinations, ended completely last year. Once they were back in the air to make many pilots feel out of practice. Picture showing JetBlue Airways airbus A320-232 taking off from Los Angeles International Airport on January 13, 2021

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits pilots from flying on a commercial jet until they have made three takeoffs and three landings (either in the aircraft or in the simulator in the last 90 days (

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits pilots from flying a commercial jet until they have performed three takeoffs and three landings – either in the aircraft or in the simulator – in the last 90 days.

Airline experts have long acknowledged that when pilots remain inactive for long periods of time, their skills decline rapidly and they tend to make errors, such as flying too fast or too high during landing. Or forget to get clearance from the Air Traffic Control Tower before landing. Low height.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits pilots from flying on a commercial jet until they perform three takeoffs and three landings – either on an aircraft or simulator in the last 90 days.

But the FAA amended that requirement twice last year, giving the pilots more leverage, although no US airline has yet indicated the need for the pilot to use it.

In April and May, the number of daily takeoffs in the US decreased by about 75% from pre-epidemic levels.

According to industry data, in recent months, the number of takeoffs has fallen by 43% from pre-pandemic.

As a result, some pilots have been brought back to work after being away for four months.

Last week Delta Air Lines announced that it planned to bring back about 400 pilots over the summer, with the hope that delivery of COVID-19 vaccines would boost travel demand.

Aviation experts say that modern passenger jets have adequate backup systems to protect minor oversights from serious accidents.

Richard G., Senior Vice President of the Air Safety Institute of the Association of Aircraft Owners and Pilots. McSpadden Jr. said: ‘Frequency is the key to flying safely. You’re not that fast if you haven’t flown for a while. ‘

However, the International Air Transport Association, a trade group for the world’s airlines, reported an increase last spring in the rate of aircraft making the ‘unstable approach’, which usually occurs when pilots are at very high speeds or Let’s try to get down without enough emphasis. And last-minute adjustments have to be made.

The airlines group reported that the rate of ‘unstable outlook’ jumped from about 13 or 14 for every 1,000 flights before the 1,000 per 1,000 epidemic in May.

The group said that in the spring and summer of 2020, the problem of volatile approaches increased at airports around the world, but the rate returned to pre-epidemic levels in the last few months.

But many experts say they are not worried. Kenneth P., chairman of the Department of Flight Training at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Byrnes said that commercial passenger jets always fly with the pilot and co-pilot to reduce the odds of pilot error.

He said: ‘I am comfortable with security requirements. I do not think there is an imminent danger. ‘

Mark Serle, global director for safety at the International Air Transport Association, said he believed the pilots were on top of their need to do more training.

“If they follow the standard operating procedures that we practice, I don’t think there’s a problem,” he said.

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association recently offered a video series on its website to help out-of-practice pilots sharpen their flying skills.

The series includes tutorials on using the radio to communicate with an air traffic control tower and tips for making a smooth landing.

American Airlines, one of the world’s largest carriers, was concerned about pilots being out of practice, so it began a more frequent review of its data on pilot performance.

The 2020 pilot data showed no loss in proficiency, said Kimball Stone, American Airlines’ senior vice president of flight operations.

“There is no loss of skill,” he said.

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