A Disney employee said on Facebook that he received a COVID vaccine


The 33-year-old Disney employee stated on Facebook that she received a COVID vaccine – as the California hospital admitted it dosages to people who are not healthcare workers

  • The woman, 33, of Riverside, California, wrote on Facebook that she received the COVID-19 vaccine
  • The woman, a Disney employee, is not a front-line health care worker
  • She wrote that she was able to vaccinate due to a family relationship in the hospital
  • Her husband’s aunt is a ‘big deal’ at Redlands Community Hospital, she wrote
  • The hospital said it gives non-frontline workers the remaining dose of the vaccine

A Disneyland employee claimed on Facebook that she had received the Pfizer BioNotech COVID-19 vaccine, even though she is not a frontline health care worker and said she received it because her husband’s aunt was a ‘big’ at a local hospital Talk ‘

The post, by a 33-year-old woman from Riverside, California, includes a photo of her vaccination card from Redlands Community Hospital in nearby Redlands.

‘When I woke up this morning, I didn’t think I would get the COVID-19 vaccine today. But here we are. I am very happy, ‘the Riverside woman wrote on her Facebook page on 20 December.

‘Science is basically my religion, so it was a big deal for me.’

A 33-year-old Disneyland employee wrote a Facebook post on 20 December in which she stated that she had received the Pfizer BioNotech COVID-19 vaccine, even though she is not a front-line health care worker. Disneyland Resort is seen in the above file photo in Anaheim, California

The unnamed woman claimed on Facebook that she was given a coronavirus vaccine because her husband's aunt is a 'big deal' at Redlands Community Hospital in Redlands, California (seen in file photo above)

The unnamed woman claimed on Facebook that she was given a coronavirus vaccine because her husband’s aunt is a ‘big deal’ at Redlands Community Hospital in Redlands, California (seen in file photo above)

The content of the post was revealed by the Orange County Register, which did not contain the woman’s name.

When a Facebook friend asked her how she could get the vaccine because it was not yet available to the general public, she replied that her husband’s aunt is a ‘big deal’ in the Redlands community.

She also wrote that the hospital had leftovers that were ready to expire.

The hospital released a statement detailing how the leftover dose was delivered, although it declined to say whether the woman was among those who received one of the shots.

“Redlands Community Hospital allocated Pfizer vaccines to its frontline physicians, healthcare workers and support staff according to the guidelines of the California Department of Public Health,” the statement said.

After being administered to physicians and staff showing interest in the vaccine, several doses were left.

‘Because the reconstituted Pfizer vaccine must be used or disposed of within hours, non-front-line healthcare workers are given multiple doses so that valuable vaccines are not thrown away.’

The hospital did not reveal how many remaining doses were available to the frontline staff and support staff on December 18, after starting the vaccination.

The Pfizer vaccine is effective only when stored at a temperature of -94 ° F.

If it is not administered immediately after thawing, it should be thrown out.

Each vial of vaccine contains five doses, although some have been found as two additional doses.

The federal government wants hospitals to administer every available dose, including survivors.

The hospital said it has vaccinated non-frontline workers for remaining doses.  The image above shows a vial of the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine

The hospital said it has vaccinated non-frontline workers for remaining doses. The image above shows a vial of the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration said in December that in view of the public health emergency, the FDA is advising that it is acceptable to use every full dose obtainable (VI, or possibly VII) from each vial. Statement of 16.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that frontline health care workers and support staff receive the highest priority in the delivery of vaccines.

The next in line to receive vaccines during the first phase of delivery is unsafe populations, particularly in nursing homes.

A spokesman for the California Department of Public Health said, “Federal and state vaccine guidelines have given priority to our frontline health care workers who are risking their lives to fight the virus.”

‘We urge all health care providers to follow the state guidelines on vaccination steps that were created in consultation with experts and community leaders.’

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