A Confederate soldier’s statue has been taken near the site of the violent 2017 Charlottesville rally


The mob created a commotion after laborers removed a Confederate statue outside a Virginia courthouse after being erected for the first time.

The memorial – depicting an unnamed Confederate soldier and titled ‘At Ready’ – was taken down from its foundation in front of the courtyard of Albemar County in Charlottesville on Saturday morning.

It was an important occasion for residents still coming back from the violent Unite the Right rally that came back to the city in August 2017. The two-day performance, in which Neo-Nazis branded tiki torches, culminated in a 32– death. Year-old counter-guards.

‘It’s a great moment,’ Don Gathers, a 61-year-old local man, told The Washington Post that he saw the statue coming down.

‘The part of racial tension, conflict and protest that we are seeing nationwide originates from here in Charlottesville. But now we are moving the needle in a positive way. ‘

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The mob created a commotion after activists removed a Confederate statue outside the Albemarral Courthouse in Charlottesville on Saturday

The statue of the anonymous soldier, titled 'At Ready', was laid back in 1909

The statue of the anonymous soldier, titled ‘At Ready’, was laid back in 1909

City officials urged residents to stay home and watch a livestream of the removal on Facebook, but dozens still turned out to see the statue

City officials urged residents to stay home and watch a livestream of the removal on Facebook, but dozens still turned out to see the statue

A local activist is seen speaking before removing the idol on Saturday morning

A local activist is seen speaking before removing the idol on Saturday morning

Albemar County’s Board of Supervisors voted last month to remove the monument. They later agreed to spend $ 60,000 of taxpayer money on a local forklift crew.

An additional $ 3,600 of taxpayer money was also used to cover the cost of flatbed trucks, which would carry the monument to the new home of the Shanando Valley Battlefields Foundation.

The foundation preserves Civil War items and monuments for historical and educational purposes.

In the hope of keeping people away from the area in the midst of a coronovirus epidemic, city officials carried out the removal process on the county of the albumler Facebook page.

Albemar County's Board of Supervisors voted last month to remove the monument.  They later agreed to splash $ 60,000 on a local forklift crew

Albemar County’s Board of Supervisors voted last month to remove the monument. They later agreed to splash $ 60,000 on a local forklift crew

The statue will be taken to the Shenando Valley Battlefields Foundation to be preserved as a historical object

The statue will be taken to the Shenando Valley Battlefields Foundation to be preserved as a historical object

Not everyone was happy about the removal.  Some people on Facebook claimed that this is the location of a 'canceled culture' that would result in less freedom for all people

Not everyone was happy about the removal. Some people on Facebook claimed that this is a ‘cancell culture’ that would result in less freedom for all people

The statue taken was Confederate General Robert E.  It was located a short distance from Lee's memorial, which still stands

Statue taken, Confederate General Robert E. Was located just a short distance from Lee’s memorial, which still stands

However, that did not stop the small crowd of supporters from coming to the courtyard to celebrate.

Not everyone was happy about removing it, however, with some saying it was endemic to a ‘canceled culture’, which would result in less freedom for all people.

‘Oh look we remove all the monuments and hide the past, now we don’t have to remember it. Madness … ‘a Facebook user complained.

The statue taken was Confederate General Robert E. Located just a block away from Lee’s controversial memorial.

The proposal to remove that public demonstration united the 2017 The Right Rally.

Back in July 2017, members of the Clu Klux Klan set out in Charlottesville to protest against the removal of the Lee Monument.

The following month, the Unite the Right rally was held.

Confederate General Robert E. in Charlottesville.  Lee's Statue (Picture)

Confederate General Robert E. in Charlottesville. Lee’s Statue (Picture)

Back in July 2017, members of the Clu Klux Klan set out in Charlottesville to protest against the removal of the Lee memorial (pictured).

Back in July 2017, members of the Chloe Klux Klan set out in Charlottesville to protest against the removal of the Lee memorial (pictured).

Protestors counter-attack in a violent demonstration and rally in Charlottesville in August 2017

Violent demonstrations and rallies in Charlottesville in August 2017 saw protesters and militants combating

Last year, a circuit court judge declared that the statue could not be removed without permission from the state because it found the classification as a ‘memorial to war veterans’. Such a judge ruled, it is protected by Virginia law.

The Code of Virginia declared that it was ‘illegal for local authorities to disturb or disrupt any monument or monument.’

Since then, the monument has been damaged with chisels and painted with the words ‘Impeach Trump’.

According to The Washington Post, armed rightists have begun their own patrols with ‘militia groups’ to protect the monument as legal battles continue.

Meanwhile, other Confederate statues have also been torn down in recent months, a national ban on the race that led to the death of unarmed black man George Floyd on Memorial Day.

Robert E. Another statue of Lee, still standing in Richmond, Virginia, was plastered with frescoes amidst Black Lives Matter protests.

Confederate General Robert E. on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia.  A statue of Lee was plastered with graffiti after the Black Lives Matter march in June.

Confederate General Robert E. on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia. A statue of Lee was plastered with graffiti after the Black Lives Matter march in June.

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