& # 39; Ghost Ships & # 39; they rise along the Japanese coast, probably from North Korea: the bidirectional: NPR



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The remains of a boat are seen along a sea wall in Yurihonjo in Akita prefecture in Japan on Friday. Several ships believed to be from North Korea – including some carrying dead bodies – have ravaged the Japanese coast in recent weeks.

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The remains of a boat are seen along a sea wall in Yurihonjo, in the Japanese prefecture of Akita, on Friday. A series of ships believed to be from North Korea – including some carrying dead bodies – have swept the Japanese coast in recent weeks.

AFP / Getty Images

A small wooden ship arrived at the coast in Akita Prefecture in Japan on Monday. Inside the ghost ship were the bodies of eight people, partially skeletonized.

The Coast Guard of Japan said it was working to determine the nationalities of the dead, but a Japanese Coast Guard official told The Associated Press that one of the men was holding North Korea Currency.

The ship reached the coast about 45 kilometers north of where another ship made landfall last week with eight men who said they were from North Korea, Reuters reports. They had been stranded with their squid catch, according to the AP.

Also this month, the coast guard would have rescued three North Korean fishermen whose boat had capsized. The bodies of two men were found on the coast of an island in the Sea of ​​Japan, and Reuters says they found cigarettes and life jackets from North Korea with Korean letters.

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In response, the Coast Guard of Japan says it is stepping up its surveillance.

"The coast guard and the police must cooperate to intensify maritime patrols around Japan," government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told the AP on Tuesday. "The government is trying to improve this to ensure that we can protect ourselves against suspicious vessels or people arriving in Japan."

Satoru Miyamoto, a professor at Seigakuin University in Japan, told CNN that there has been an increase in the washing of ships on land in Japan in recent years.

"It is after Kim Jong Un decided to expand the fishing industry as a way to increase revenues for the military, they are using old ships manned by the military, by people who do not have knowledge about fishing," Miyamoto told the announcer. . "To be continue".

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Seo Yu-suk, research manager of the North Korean Studies Institute in Seoul, told Reuters that the incidents could be the result of shortages of food in North Korea and old boats that are vulnerable to bad weather.

"North Korea pushes so hard for its people to gather more fish to compensate for their food shortages," he said.

The recent avalanche of misplaced ships is reminiscent of the end of 2015, when 12 wooden boats carrying decomposing bodies were found along the coast of Japan in the space of two months.

It is not always clear if those on board could have been collecting food or looking to defect. CNN reports that some North Korean fishermen rescued earlier this month by the Japanese authorities were returned to that country at the request of the men.

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